Friday, September 24, 2010

Mr. Colbert Goes To Congress



You've heard all about it, and here it is, complete from C-Span 3. Comedy Central's Stephen Colbert, in character as "Stephen Colbert", testifies before a US House of Representatives Committee on immigrant farm workers.

Below, from the text at C-SPAN.......

Witnesses spoke about the American agricultural sector's reliance on foreign, and often undocumented, workers to pick fruit and vegetables on America's farms. Comedy Central's Stephen Colbert appeared in character to testify. Mr. Colbert was part of a United Farm Workers campaign calling on unemployed Americans to take jobs in the agriculture sector. As part of the program he spent a day laboring at a vegetable farm in New York in August 2010.


To be honest, I've only seen a few excerpts of Stephens's testimony, and listened to the rage on the right, the laughter by some on the left, and the utter confusion by most members of the media.

I'm going to watch as much of this as I can, and post a comment or two later

5 comments:

Sue said...

All the clips I saw today were of the comedic part. Keith showed a clip tonight that had a more serious tone, Colbert saying the migrant workers suffer and have no voice, he said he wants to be that voice. So while Fox hosts were screaming "outrageous" all day (such hypocrites because it was the GOP who invited ELMO to speak to Congress)they will probably never show the serious clip, they are disgusting!

JUDI M. said...

What are the RWNJS all upset about? We got to watch their "outrageous" shenanigans for weeks on C-span during the HCR debate. So,is dropping stacks of paper on the floor,or bringing bowls of peanuts and the like to congressional hearings supposed to be taken seriously?" How about "No, and Hell no"? Hypocrites all of them. Besides, satire and understated humor have no place in the GOP (snark).

TomCat said...

Loved it!

Norma said...

It's amazing to me that congress thinks it needs to hear from these people who have nothing to say.

Hugh Jee From Jersey said...

It isn't the first time in history that somebody went to Congress to testify and nobody in the committee had a clue what was going on.

Way back...July 8, 1958....New York Yankees manager Casey Stengel testified before the Senate Anti-Trust and Monopoly Subcommittee....here's a portion of what "The Ole Prefesser" said...

Senator O'Mahoney: I am trying to get it down from your standpoint as a forty-eight-year-man in baseball.

Mr. Stengel: That is why I stayed in it. I have been discharged fifteen times and rehired; so you get rehired in baseball, and they don't want a good ballplayer leaving, and I always say a high-priced baseball player should get a high salary just like a moving-picture actor. He should not get the same thing as the twenty-fifth man on a ball club who is very fortunate he is sitting on your ball club, and I say it is very hard to have skill in baseball.

Senator O'Mahoney: You are not changing the subject; are you, sir?

Mr. Stengel: No. You asked the question and I told you that if you want to find out how minor league baseball is; it is terrible now. How can you eat on $2.50 a day when up here you can eat on $8 or better than $8. Now how can you travel in a bus all night and play ball the next night to make a living? How can you, a major league man, make it so that you can't? Is he going to fly all of them to each place?

Senator O'Mahoney: I am not arguing with you, Mr. Stengel.

Mr. Stengel: I am just saying minor league ball has outgrown itself, like every small town has outgrown itself industrially because they don't put a plant in there to keep the people working so they leave.

Casey's complete testimony can be found here.

At the end of Stengel's testimony, Mickey Mantle was asked his opinion of baseball's anti-trust exemption. He answered..."My view is about the same as Casey's".

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